Dear Esther – Conceptual Essayistic Review

“When this paper aeroplane leaves the cliff edge and carves parallel vapour trails in the dark, we will come together”.

Imagine yourself outside the comforts of this world. Imagine a time when technological and industrial advances weren’t a key subject in the local newspapers. When electricity wasn’t singing its song into the blissful evenings that were setting upon the little farm houses.

Picture the flickering pale light of a candle. It whispers nuances around it.. It whispers translucent bedtime stories of heroes and villains alike – with they swords and shields polished for the greatest battle they’ve ever seen.

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Visualize a storm in the distance, the sound of waves crashing down gently into the rocky facade of an old-forgotten island. And the aged lighthouse not emitting life-saving signals anymore… just memories of how vigor used to caress perpetual smiles.

A boat without a bottom, a means of transportation without passengers, a lonely seagull looking for shelter and the sea, the ancient sea witnessing all the humankind’s history.

You have a mission. To reach one final destination before closing the deal with this existence. You travel across the deserted island and encounter rocky formations that stand up like pagan altars – used for praying to Gods and Goddesses for health and prosperous harvests.

All you can see are abandoned ships. Seems like the world traveled afar from here and never came back. Like people never existed and this tragic game of souls wasn’t developed properly. Source code for sadness.

Beyond and above the scarred, dried bushes – there is an abandoned house. You take shelter there – hoping that the coming storm will leave soon and will never betray its origin. You can hear its cruel moaning entering the broken windows. Little drops of rain touching your face. This was only meant to caress you, to reassure you that everything will be fine from now on, but they feel like cold spikes on a everlasting winter. It is too lonely here. Yet, you continue your journey.

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Watery caves. Fluorescent mushrooms. Stalactites and stalagmites.

Underground lake formations. Rivers of calcareous water. The rocks beneath you are slippery. You touch the walls of the cave with your bare hands and feel the magical coldness installed here. Wet, unstable, unfriendly, unwelcome, deadly…

The air is filled with sprinkles of humidified substances. A cavern of troublesome trips. A labyrinth of paths that lead outside through a collection of survival attempts. You have to ascend, then descend and repeat the whole process. Following the waterfalls you engage in a deadly dive. It is now a crucial point in your journey. It is just a leap of faith. Faith that cannot be comprehended, nor explained in any book.

And all this leads you to the last portion of your journey. The longest journey ever taken…

What once was a port for large vessels – became now a ruin of nothingness. The skeleton of a dead whale… a reminder that where life ends… possibilities are unknown. The storm has passed, but strong winds still haul above you – attacking the mountain you are about to climb. Shadowy figures appear to be watching you… yet when you reach the point where the dark stranger sat – you find nothing, only a half-burned candle.

You take a deep breath. And you ascend. You are at the tower. A Babylon ready to be reborn. Damascus at dawn, with no-one around.

And you – poetically progressing – take another leap of faith… faith that cannot be comprehended, nor explained in any book…

 

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